Vermont Law School


Vermont Law School to Open New Center
for Agriculture and Food Systems

Dear Colleagues,

I am writing to invite you to be part of an exciting development at Vermont Law School. In the spring of 2011, we will open the Vermont Law Center for Agriculture and Food Systems, which will support advocates, agencies, food hubs, incubators, and farmers engaged in the creation of community-based agriculture systems in the U.S. and internationally.

I invite you to join in the launch of this new center through our 2011 Sustainable Food Systems Summer Scholar program. We will select a noted academic or practitioner in this field to spend two weeks in Vermont during our Summer Session to conduct research and participate in colloquia. Vermont Law School will pay travel expenses for the scholar, provide housing, and pay a $5,000 stipend. To apply, or to nominate a colleague, please send a cover letter and résumé to Anne Mansfield, associate director of the Environmental Law Center, at amansfield@vermontlaw.edu.

The Center for Agriculture and Food Systems will focus on legal and policy issues related to community-based agriculture, the regulation of food, the Farm Bill and agricultural subsidies, energy-efficient food production, energy independence for farmers, and other issues key to retaining a successful working landscape for rural communities. Vermont Law School is the ideal place to initiate this effort: Vermont is synonymous with the farming landscape and leads the nation in the sophistication of its effort to implement a sustainable agricultural system.

The center will be modeled after our highly successful Institute for Energy and the Environment and will build on recent efforts at VLS. We hosted a conference on Food, Fuel, and the Future of Farming, which brought over 200 scholars, activists, and farmers together. We convened a colloquium with the Northeast Organic Farming Association and Rural Vermont on farmers’ market insurance issues. And, we published The Farmer’s Handbook for Energy Self-Reliance, distributed to over 4,000 farmers and taken to over a dozen farmers’ forums and conferences nationally.

This spring, we will recruit a director for the center with national experience in the field who will work with our environmental faculty and Summer Session faculty, many of whom have produced scholarship in this area. Students from our Agricultural Law Society will assist in the work of the center, and many of them will join the ranks of our alumni who work with organizations such as the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the Center for Food Safety, and the Vermont Department of Agriculture.

Please accept this invitation to apply or nominate a colleague to be the first Sustainable Food Systems Summer Scholar at the new Vermont Law Center for Agriculture and Food Systems.

Best regards,
Marc B. Mihaly
Professor of Law
Director, Environmental Law Center
Associate Dean, Environmental Law Program

164 Chelsea Street, PO Box 96 | South Royalton, VT 05068 US

See here.

VERMONT LAW SCHOOL is seeking applicants for the position of Associate Dean to coordinate our Clinical, Experiential and Simulation programs.  This is a tenured or tenure-track position.  A description of these programs can be found at our website at http://www.vermontlaw.edu/Academics/Clinics_and_Experiential_Programs.htm

The Associate Dean will be part of the central academic administration along with the Vice Dean for Academic Affairs and the Associate Dean for Environmental Programs.

Those eligible for consideration must have the following characteristics:  significant experience in law school clinical or experiential education; significant published scholarship on clinical or experiential education; demonstrated leadership and management experience; and excellent interpersonal skills.

Vermont Law School embraces diversity in its recruitment and hiring efforts.  Accordingly, candidates of color, women and those from other under-represented groups are strongly encouraged to apply for this position.

Faculty at Vermont Law School take seriously our mission to educate lawyers for the community and the world and believe that our scholarship, teaching, and service should be meaningful and relevant to the local, national, and international communities. VLS is unique among law schools. We are on the cutting edge of environmental and international law and social policy. We embody the spirit of Vermont — independence and diversity in people and in politics. We have the good fortune to be located in a state and region that offer numerous opportunities for engaged participation in civic life as well as a life style found at few, if any, other law schools.

Applicants should provide a cover letter and resume. Electronic applications are preferred and should be e-mailed to: facultysearch@vermontlaw.edu. Hard copy applications should be sent to: Coordinator, Faculty Appointments Committee, Vermont Law School, P.O. Box 96, South Royalton, VT 05068.

VERMONT LAW SCHOOL seeks to fill the position of Director of Externship Programs.  The Director will be a member of the faculty and report directly to the Associate Dean for Clinical and Experiential Programs.  The Director will have the assistance of and supervise one full-time faculty member and one full-time administrative assistant.  This is a contract faculty position, but highly qualified candidates may be considered for a tenure track appointment.

Key responsibilities of this position include overseeing and facilitating assignment to offsite locations, selection, supervision and training of off-site mentors, teaching of, or supervising the teaching of, the classroom component of off-site placements, and advising and orienting students.  The Director will work with the Associate Dean for Clinical and Experiential Programs to promote coordination between the externship programs and other experiential programs and between externship programs and the Office of Career Services.

Externship programs at VLS include a full-time Semester in Practice involving placements in the United States and abroad, a full-time and part-time Judicial Externship Program, and a part-time externship program involving placements near the VLS campus.   A description of these programs can be found at our website at http://www.vermontlaw.edu/Academics/Clinics_and_Experiential_Programs.htm

Candidates must have a JD degree and must possess excellent organization and interpersonal skills. Experience in administration and/or management preferred along with either broad experience in different areas of legal practice or a record of education development as well as a demonstrated ability to innovate and lead.

Vermont Law School embraces diversity in its recruitment and hiring efforts.  Accordingly, candidates of color, women and those from other underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply for this position.

Faculty at Vermont Law School take seriously our mission to educate lawyers for the community and the world and believe that our scholarship, teaching, and service should be meaningful and relevant to the local, national, and international communities. VLS is unique among law schools. We are on the cutting edge of environmental and international law and social policy. We embody the spirit of Vermont — independence and diversity in people and in politics. We have the good fortune to be located in a state and region that offer numerous opportunities for engaged participation in civic life as well as a life style found at few, if any, other law schools.

Applicants should provide a cover letter and resume. Electronic applications are preferred and should be e-mailed to: facultysearch@vermontlaw.edu. Hard copy applications should be sent to: Coordinator, Faculty Appointments Committee, Vermont Law School, P.O. Box 96, South Royalton, VT 05068.

We’ve revised our faculty job announcement to reflect that, while we are open to all subject matters, we are particularly interested in individuals in commercial law and business law — U.S., comparative and/or international, and international environmental law.  The ad:

Vermont Law School is seeking several colleagues to join our dynamic and committed faculty. Our curricular needs are varied and include first-year courses, advanced subjects, particularly courses in commercial law and business law — U.S., comparative and/or international, and international environmental law — and clinical teaching. We will consider experienced faculty, entry-level candidates, and candidates with significant experience in government, consulting, business, NGO management, or law firm administration and leadership.

Candidates should show a commitment to excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service. Vermont Law School is committed to establishing and maintaining a diverse faculty and encourages applications from members of historically underrepresented groups.

Faculty at Vermont Law School take seriously our mission to educate lawyers for the community and the world and believe that our scholarship, teaching, and service should be meaningful and relevant to the local, national, and international communities. VLS is unique among law schools. We are on the cutting edge of environmental and international law and social policy. We embody the spirit of Vermont’s independence and diversity in people and in politics. We have the good fortune to be located in a state and region that offer numerous opportunities for engaged participation in civic life as well as a life style found at few, if any, other law schools.

Applicants should provide a cover letter and resume. Electronic applications are preferred and should be e-mailed to: facultysearch@vermontlaw.edu. Hard copy applications should be sent to: Coordinator, Faculty Appointments Committee, Vermont Law School, P.O. Box 96, South Royalton, VT 05068.

Today was the first day of classes at Vermont Law School, and I’m teaching Natural Resoucres Law.  I enjoy teaching this course immensely.  Today we identified three key questions: (1) What is a natural resource?; (2) Who should protect natural resources?; and (3) Why should we protect natural resources?  These are three questions that must be answered to create natural resources law and policy.

One of my favorite parts of the first day of class is asking students, what is a natural resource?  Bison? Cattle? Hamburger? Trees? Lumber?  We have strong viewpoints as to what we should protect as natural resources, but we often give less thought to the cultural, social, artistic, religious, and philsophical reasons for labeling some things as ‘natural resources’ and others not, and, therefore, choosing what deserves protection.

(Of note: It’s also my daughter’s first day of Kindergarten.  I think I’m more nervous about Kindergarten than she is!)

Today begins Vermont Law School Orientation for new first-year students, and faculty are introduced and mingle with the students.  Admittedly, after a year in China, I’m finding it all a bit overwhelming.  In China, despite the 14.5 million people in Guangzhou, I was a cultural outsider, did not speak the language fluently, and, thus, could and was often expected to be quiet and on the sidelines.  Today, during our opening convocation, I was in a room with more English speakers than I have experienced in a year, and students and faculty alike sought me out to say hello and ask me about my travels.  I’m enjoying be back and everyone’s kindness, but a little reverse culture shock is setting in.

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