Vermont Law School


The First Annual Colloquium on Environmental Scholarship was simply a resounding success.  Bringing together environmental law professors from both the United States and Canada, at various stages of their careers, Vermont Law School provided the perfect collegial forum for the sharing of our works-in-progress and scholarly ideas.  I think everyone is already looking forward to next year’s event, and we expect interest in the Colloquium to grow.

Thank you to all those that presented and all my colleagues at Vermont who attended and moderated.  It was a truly a great time.

Vermont Law School Professor David Mears, in China as a Fulbright Scholar, reflects upon EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson’s visit to China.  He writes,

Yesterday, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson held a town meeting in Huashi Hall, a beautiful, old building on the Sun Yat Sen University campus in Guangzhou, China.  This location happens to be just a few minutes from our apartment, so my wife Nancy and I were able to attend, along with an auditorium full of Chinese students and faculty.  It was a fun experience, surrounded by the students with their obvious interest and excitement in being able to engage with a high-level U.S. official.  Adding to my enjoyment was being able to sit next to my Vermont Law School colleague Professor Tseming Yang who is now a Deputy General Counsel at EPA, and Orestes Anastasia, Vermont Law School Class of 1995 who is the Regional Environment Advisor for USAID in Asia.

The title of Administrator Jackson’s presentation was “30 Years of Cooperation with China.”  It is tempting to launch off this title into a reflection regarding whether enough progress has actually been achieved for the environment in China in the past thirty years sufficient to warrant an anniversary celebration.  It is enough to note simply that, given the state of the environment in China today, whatever has transpired in terms of cooperation between the EPA and Chinese environmental agencies over the past three decades should not serve as the model for addressing China’s environmental issues in the future.

Keep reading at Middle Earth Law.

Vermont Law School invites VT gubernatorial candidates Dem. Peter Shumlin and Rep. Brian Dubie to an Oct. 26 debate in the run up to Election Day. The event, which is free and open to the public, will start at 5:30 p.m. in the Chase Community Center.

UPDATED: According to the press release, Shumlin has accepted the invitation, but Dubie has not yet responded.

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The first annual Colloquium on Environmental Scholarship at Vermont Law School on October, 22, 2010 promises to be a fantastic event.  Thank you to everyone who submitted a paper, and congratulations to those selected to participate.  The Colloquium, designed as a works-in-progress event, provides an opportunity for environmental and natural resources law scholars to present their forthcoming scholarship, get feedback from colleagues, and meet and interact with those who are also teaching and researching in the environmental and natural resources law area.

I am thrilled to announce this spectacular list of participants:

  • Todd Aagaard, Assistant Professor, Villanova University School of Law
  • Mary Jane Angelo, Associate Professor of Law, University of Florida, Levin College of Law
  • Eric Biber, Assistant Professor of Law, University of California, Berkeley
  • Robin Kundis Craig, Associate Dean for Environmental Programs & Attorneys’ Title Professor of Law, Florida State University College of Law
  • Jason J. Czarnezki, Professor of Law, Vermont Law School
  • David M. Driesen, University Professor, Syracuse University College of Law
  • Timothy P. Duane, Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz and Vermont Law School
  • Pamela N. Epstein, Esq., LL.M, Consulting Attorney & Legal Intern Coordinator, Sierra Club, San Diego Chapter
  • Patricia L. Farnese, Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan College of Law
  • T.L. Gray, Doctoral Student, Vanderbilt University, Laboratory of Ethics and Society
  • Shi-Ling Hsu, University of British Columbia Faculty of Law
  • Madeline June Kass, Associate Professor  of Law, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
  • Andrew Long, Assistant Professor, Florida Coastal School of Law
  • Bradford Mank, Professor of Law, University of Cincinnati College of Law
  • Lesley K. McAllister, Professor of Law, University of San Diego School of Law
  • Timothy M. Mulvaney, Associate Professor of Law, Texas Wesleyan University School of Law
  • Sean Nolon, Director of Dispute Resolution Program and Associate Professor of Law, Vermont Law School
  • Uma Outka, Visiting Scholar in Energy and Land Use Law, Florida State University College of Law
  • Jessica Owley-Lippmann, Associate Professor, University at Buffalo Law School
  • Dave Owen, Assistant Professor of Law, University of Maine School of Law
  • Cymie Payne, Distinguished Environmental Law Scholar, Lewis and Clark School of Law
  • Tracey M. Roberts, Assistant Professor of Law, University of Louisville, Louis D. Brandeis School of Law
  • Shannon Roesler, Assistant Professor of Law, Oklahoma City University School of Law
  • Jonathan D. Rosenbloom, Assistant Professor, Drake University Law School
  • Erin Ryan, Associate Professor, William & Mary Law School
  • Jack Tuholske, Visiting Professor, Vermont Law School, and Adjunct Professor, University of Montana
  • Nickie Vlavianos, Assistant Professor, University of Calgary Faculty of Law
  • Annecoos Wiersema, Associate Professor of Law, University of Denver Sturm College of Law
  • Hannah Wiseman, Associate Professor, University of Tulsa College of Law

For more information, see http://www.vermontlaw.edu/ces2010, and check out the story about the Colloquium in our Fall Newsletter.

Vermont Law School to Open New Center
for Agriculture and Food Systems

Dear Colleagues,

I am writing to invite you to be part of an exciting development at Vermont Law School. In the spring of 2011, we will open the Vermont Law Center for Agriculture and Food Systems, which will support advocates, agencies, food hubs, incubators, and farmers engaged in the creation of community-based agriculture systems in the U.S. and internationally.

I invite you to join in the launch of this new center through our 2011 Sustainable Food Systems Summer Scholar program. We will select a noted academic or practitioner in this field to spend two weeks in Vermont during our Summer Session to conduct research and participate in colloquia. Vermont Law School will pay travel expenses for the scholar, provide housing, and pay a $5,000 stipend. To apply, or to nominate a colleague, please send a cover letter and résumé to Anne Mansfield, associate director of the Environmental Law Center, at amansfield@vermontlaw.edu.

The Center for Agriculture and Food Systems will focus on legal and policy issues related to community-based agriculture, the regulation of food, the Farm Bill and agricultural subsidies, energy-efficient food production, energy independence for farmers, and other issues key to retaining a successful working landscape for rural communities. Vermont Law School is the ideal place to initiate this effort: Vermont is synonymous with the farming landscape and leads the nation in the sophistication of its effort to implement a sustainable agricultural system.

The center will be modeled after our highly successful Institute for Energy and the Environment and will build on recent efforts at VLS. We hosted a conference on Food, Fuel, and the Future of Farming, which brought over 200 scholars, activists, and farmers together. We convened a colloquium with the Northeast Organic Farming Association and Rural Vermont on farmers’ market insurance issues. And, we published The Farmer’s Handbook for Energy Self-Reliance, distributed to over 4,000 farmers and taken to over a dozen farmers’ forums and conferences nationally.

This spring, we will recruit a director for the center with national experience in the field who will work with our environmental faculty and Summer Session faculty, many of whom have produced scholarship in this area. Students from our Agricultural Law Society will assist in the work of the center, and many of them will join the ranks of our alumni who work with organizations such as the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the Center for Food Safety, and the Vermont Department of Agriculture.

Please accept this invitation to apply or nominate a colleague to be the first Sustainable Food Systems Summer Scholar at the new Vermont Law Center for Agriculture and Food Systems.

Best regards,
Marc B. Mihaly
Professor of Law
Director, Environmental Law Center
Associate Dean, Environmental Law Program

164 Chelsea Street, PO Box 96 | South Royalton, VT 05068 US

See here.

VERMONT LAW SCHOOL is seeking applicants for the position of Associate Dean to coordinate our Clinical, Experiential and Simulation programs.  This is a tenured or tenure-track position.  A description of these programs can be found at our website at http://www.vermontlaw.edu/Academics/Clinics_and_Experiential_Programs.htm

The Associate Dean will be part of the central academic administration along with the Vice Dean for Academic Affairs and the Associate Dean for Environmental Programs.

Those eligible for consideration must have the following characteristics:  significant experience in law school clinical or experiential education; significant published scholarship on clinical or experiential education; demonstrated leadership and management experience; and excellent interpersonal skills.

Vermont Law School embraces diversity in its recruitment and hiring efforts.  Accordingly, candidates of color, women and those from other under-represented groups are strongly encouraged to apply for this position.

Faculty at Vermont Law School take seriously our mission to educate lawyers for the community and the world and believe that our scholarship, teaching, and service should be meaningful and relevant to the local, national, and international communities. VLS is unique among law schools. We are on the cutting edge of environmental and international law and social policy. We embody the spirit of Vermont — independence and diversity in people and in politics. We have the good fortune to be located in a state and region that offer numerous opportunities for engaged participation in civic life as well as a life style found at few, if any, other law schools.

Applicants should provide a cover letter and resume. Electronic applications are preferred and should be e-mailed to: facultysearch@vermontlaw.edu. Hard copy applications should be sent to: Coordinator, Faculty Appointments Committee, Vermont Law School, P.O. Box 96, South Royalton, VT 05068.

VERMONT LAW SCHOOL seeks to fill the position of Director of Externship Programs.  The Director will be a member of the faculty and report directly to the Associate Dean for Clinical and Experiential Programs.  The Director will have the assistance of and supervise one full-time faculty member and one full-time administrative assistant.  This is a contract faculty position, but highly qualified candidates may be considered for a tenure track appointment.

Key responsibilities of this position include overseeing and facilitating assignment to offsite locations, selection, supervision and training of off-site mentors, teaching of, or supervising the teaching of, the classroom component of off-site placements, and advising and orienting students.  The Director will work with the Associate Dean for Clinical and Experiential Programs to promote coordination between the externship programs and other experiential programs and between externship programs and the Office of Career Services.

Externship programs at VLS include a full-time Semester in Practice involving placements in the United States and abroad, a full-time and part-time Judicial Externship Program, and a part-time externship program involving placements near the VLS campus.   A description of these programs can be found at our website at http://www.vermontlaw.edu/Academics/Clinics_and_Experiential_Programs.htm

Candidates must have a JD degree and must possess excellent organization and interpersonal skills. Experience in administration and/or management preferred along with either broad experience in different areas of legal practice or a record of education development as well as a demonstrated ability to innovate and lead.

Vermont Law School embraces diversity in its recruitment and hiring efforts.  Accordingly, candidates of color, women and those from other underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply for this position.

Faculty at Vermont Law School take seriously our mission to educate lawyers for the community and the world and believe that our scholarship, teaching, and service should be meaningful and relevant to the local, national, and international communities. VLS is unique among law schools. We are on the cutting edge of environmental and international law and social policy. We embody the spirit of Vermont — independence and diversity in people and in politics. We have the good fortune to be located in a state and region that offer numerous opportunities for engaged participation in civic life as well as a life style found at few, if any, other law schools.

Applicants should provide a cover letter and resume. Electronic applications are preferred and should be e-mailed to: facultysearch@vermontlaw.edu. Hard copy applications should be sent to: Coordinator, Faculty Appointments Committee, Vermont Law School, P.O. Box 96, South Royalton, VT 05068.

We’ve revised our faculty job announcement to reflect that, while we are open to all subject matters, we are particularly interested in individuals in commercial law and business law — U.S., comparative and/or international, and international environmental law.  The ad:

Vermont Law School is seeking several colleagues to join our dynamic and committed faculty. Our curricular needs are varied and include first-year courses, advanced subjects, particularly courses in commercial law and business law — U.S., comparative and/or international, and international environmental law — and clinical teaching. We will consider experienced faculty, entry-level candidates, and candidates with significant experience in government, consulting, business, NGO management, or law firm administration and leadership.

Candidates should show a commitment to excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service. Vermont Law School is committed to establishing and maintaining a diverse faculty and encourages applications from members of historically underrepresented groups.

Faculty at Vermont Law School take seriously our mission to educate lawyers for the community and the world and believe that our scholarship, teaching, and service should be meaningful and relevant to the local, national, and international communities. VLS is unique among law schools. We are on the cutting edge of environmental and international law and social policy. We embody the spirit of Vermont’s independence and diversity in people and in politics. We have the good fortune to be located in a state and region that offer numerous opportunities for engaged participation in civic life as well as a life style found at few, if any, other law schools.

Applicants should provide a cover letter and resume. Electronic applications are preferred and should be e-mailed to: facultysearch@vermontlaw.edu. Hard copy applications should be sent to: Coordinator, Faculty Appointments Committee, Vermont Law School, P.O. Box 96, South Royalton, VT 05068.

Today was the first day of classes at Vermont Law School, and I’m teaching Natural Resoucres Law.  I enjoy teaching this course immensely.  Today we identified three key questions: (1) What is a natural resource?; (2) Who should protect natural resources?; and (3) Why should we protect natural resources?  These are three questions that must be answered to create natural resources law and policy.

One of my favorite parts of the first day of class is asking students, what is a natural resource?  Bison? Cattle? Hamburger? Trees? Lumber?  We have strong viewpoints as to what we should protect as natural resources, but we often give less thought to the cultural, social, artistic, religious, and philsophical reasons for labeling some things as ‘natural resources’ and others not, and, therefore, choosing what deserves protection.

(Of note: It’s also my daughter’s first day of Kindergarten.  I think I’m more nervous about Kindergarten than she is!)

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