Law


From today’s NT Times:

The Pentagon says that only two schools — Vermont Law School in South Royalton, Vt., and William Mitchell College of Law in St. Paul — have barred military recruiters.

But as soon as Mr. Obama and the military certify the repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell,” Vermont and William Mitchell will allow recruiters on campus, spokesman for both said on Wednesday. It is not clear when that might happen, but Mr. Obama said in his speech that he expected it to occur “this year.”

 

I just love it when the EPA actually decides to uses its veto power under section 404 of the Clean Water Act.  Holly Doremus at Legal Planet has commentary here.

Today, Vermont Law School’s Environmental Law Center launched its first annual Top 10 Environmental Watch List. Our environmental faculty and students from the Vermont Journal of Environmental Law researched more than 75 judicial, regulatory, and legislative actions before selecting what they consider the 10 most important environmental law and policy issues of 2010.   Read more at http://watchlist.vermontlaw.edu/.

With a student, I co-authored the article for No. 8 on the list, Supreme Court Reviews Genetically Modified Crops.

Sometime in 2006 I thought about writing a book, and in early 2007 I thought maybe this was a good idea.  In summer 2007, I wrote a book prospectus.  This month my first book will be published.  And now today, I am just shocked, almost 4 years later, to actually see you can pre-order (!!!) my book on Amazon.com.  Click here.  It’s titled, “Everyday Environmentalism: Law, Nature, and Individual Behavior.”  Here’s the product description:

Faced with the seemingly overwhelming prospect of global climate change and its consequences, is there anything that a person can do to make a difference? “Yes, there is!” says Jason Czarnezki. Writing as a lawyer and environmentalist, he addresses the small personal choices that individuals can make in order to have a positive effect on the natural world.  Czarnezki compellingly describes the historical and contemporary forces in the United States that have led to a culture of “convenience, consumerism, and consumption.” He also investigates the individual decisions that have the worst environmental impacts, along with the ecological costs of our food choices and the environmental costs of sprawl.  Ever aware of the importance of personal choice, Czarnezki offers a thoughtful consideration of how public policy can positively affect individual behavior.

Today, due to the generosity of contacts at WWF in Hong Kong, we received a tour of Mai Po Nature Reserve in Hong Kong’s New Territories.   Mai Po is a large wetland reserve filled with very cool flora and fauna, and really is a bird lovers’ paradise.  Mai Po is protected by the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, and our visit was truly a treat.   We saw mangroves, traditional shrimp ponds, fish farms (right outside the reserve), and beautiful flowers, and, with fancy digital binoculars and scopes, saw beautiful birds: spoonbills, herons, egrets, and ducks.

See here.

See here and here.

See here.  This will infuriate many environmentalists, and further outrage Democrats who are already outraged by potential extension of the Bush-era tax cuts.  The money quote from the NY Times Green Blog:

“Environmental advocates are furious. They fear a similar delay on the approaching start of one of the most far-reaching regulatory programs in American environmental history, the effort to curb emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.  But in a striking turnabout, the National Association of Manufacturers and the American Petroleum Institute — which have been anything but friendly to Mr. Obama — are praising his administration.”

(1) A Conn. v. AEP decision soon? Will SCOTUS take the case?

(2) An update on the climate meetings in Cancun.  But I don’t see how the U.S. can have such broad international goals given the current domestic politics of climate change.

I just finished my talk on “Climate Policy and US-China Relations” in downtown Salt Lake City.  I really didn’t know what to expect in terms of discussing climate change at a law firm in Utah.  All in all it went OK, and the view of the mountains from the 22nd floor offices of Holland & Hart was absolutely spectacular.   I had anticipated at least one climate skeptic and had prepared a response but no such questions arose.  Instead most folks seems interested in (1) my argument that the Chinese have accepted a cold and Darwinist reality that only economic powers will have the resources to adapt to climate change and thus China sees no need to curb their emissions or limit economic growth, and (2) whether China, and the U.S., are actively preparing climate adaptation measures and projects.

All is all, I’m very much enjoying my time at the University of Utah and the Stegner Center.  It’s great to meet environmental law professors at another school, and I’ve been able to catch up with some old friends as well.

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