May 2011


I received this interesting note from WWF-Hong Kong:

Ecological Footprint (English)

WWF- Hong Kong has recently released the Hong Kong Ecological Footprint Report 2010, which demonstrates that Hong Kong people are living beyond the Earth’s limits. According to the report, if everyone in the world lived a similar lifestyle to that of Hong Kong people, we would need the equivalent resources of 2.2 Earths. Hong Kong has the 45th largest Ecological Footprint per person compared to 150 countries with populations larger than 1 million people in 2007.

 The Ecological Footprint measures the extent of human demand for the regenerative capacity of the biosphere. Both quantities are expressed in units of global hectares (gha). Hong Kong has an average per person Ecological Footprint of 4.0 gha, which is more than double the 1.8 gha of biocapacity – the area actually available to produce resources and absorb CO2 – available per person globally. This report uses 2007 data.

http://assets.wwfhk.panda.org/downloads/hong_kong_ecological_footprint_report_2010.pdf

Obama is replacing the food pyramid with a dinner plate.

See here.

Here are some interesting news items and blog posts from this morning:

At this point, I remain skeptical that sustainable seafood actually can exist at present time given the overwhelming pressures placed on the world’s oceans.  Though perhaps very saavy aquaculture coupled with limited fishing and marine reserves can lead to a future with sustainable seafood from farming and wild sources.  Monterey Bay Aquarium’s (MBA) Seafood Watch program has long been the standard for choosing sustainable seafood, and its pocket guides have been common for some time.  The Gulf of Maine Research Institute (GMRI) is now getting into the mix with its own Sustainable Seafood Initiative that employs a “Responsibly Harversted” logo and its own seafood guide, which both promote seafood in the Gulf of Maine.  What perplexes me is that the GMRI guide lists seafood “local” to the Gulf of Maine and encourages its purchase, but also uses the term sustainable….What is odd is that many local choices on the list are not sustainable, as least as defined by MBA’s Northeast Guide or me (e.g., sharks, tuna, cod) and others (read the book “Four Fish”).  So the question is, can fish be considered to be harvested sustainably by individuals if in the aggregate said fish is harvested unsustainably?

UPDATE: Based on a facebook response, I would add the following:  I’m taking issue with the GMRI Guide, not the Responsibly Harvested Label. But, if only 4 seafood items (Haddock, Northern Shrimp, American Lobster, and Cod) make the label, why create a guide that gives the impression that all “local” seafood is sustainable?  There are two things going on here: (1) the guide arguably conflates sustainability and local, and, thus, (2) as other labels do, raises a question as to the appropriate definition of sustainability (local? sustainable by what standards?). You could argue, for example, that all lawful fishing is sustainable because it conforms with scientific management practices of the federal government.  This definitional problem is further illustrated by Atlantic Cod, which can receive the Responsibly Harvested Label by GMRI but is on MBA’s Avoid List.  So, if I want to eat “sustainably,” can I eat cod?

UPDATE 2: I should also reiterate my most basic rhetorical question: “Is there such a thing as sustainable wild seafood?”

My prediction that Sarah Palin will run for President and win the GOP nomination gets closer everyday.  The Times headline reads “Signs Grow that Palin May Run.”  This is going to be a bizarre and highly entertaining Republican primary.

Climate change mitigation, in full, is a dream.  Adaptation is now occuring.  See this article in the Times about Chicago’s response to climate change.  I hope we adapt far better than we mitigate; otherwise adpatation will give way to emergency repsonse.

I’ve returned from the Cooking for Solutions event at Monterey Bay Aquarium. By all accounts our eco-label panel was a success. As far as which celebrity chefs I actually met (defined as had a real face to face conversation with them, besides when they were just serving me food), here’s the list: Carla Hall (of Top Chef fame), Peter Pahk (Kingsmill Resort), Nathan Lyon (host of Growing A Greener World on PBS), Cindy Pawlcyn (Mustards Grill), Regina Charboneau (Inn at Twin Oaks), Anthony Lamas (Seviche) and of course of Vermont’s very own Eric Warnstedt of Hen of the Wood in Waterbury. In addition to the great food being presented, it was great to meet so many members of the media interested in sustainable food issues. And finally, Monterey Bay Aquarium really put on a first class event.

NYT: Vermont’s Single-Payer Health
http://mobile.nytimes.com/article?a=792581&f=19

I just went to a conversation and screening by Isabella Rossellini. She gave a great conversation about food and raising awareness about wildlife. Her short films called “Green Porno” are fantastic…click on the tab Green Porno-All, and watch away.  “Bon Appetit – Shrimp” is quite funny.

Next Page »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.